#wellMAKING Craftivist Garden

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This collaborative project from the Craftivist Collective and Fallmouth University will show how craft activities can help improve wellbeing. We all know how craft can be relaxing, and help keep you mindful but this project hopes to take this one step further and reflect on the issues that are not often spoken about, to think about challenging subjects – to reflect upon what wellbeing actually means.

If you’re based in the UK, we’d love you to join in and hand-embroider, knit or crochet a flower for the #wellMAKING Craftivist Garden, while reflecting on the imortance of wellbeing and what we need in order to flourish as individuals and as a society.

All that you need to get involved can be found at:

http://craftivist-collective.com/wellmaking

This includes an app where we can collect your answers to our questions about wellbeing which will then be presented to the All Party Paliamentary Group (APPG) on Arts & Health in January 2015, to provide evidence of the power craft has to improve our society.

Please do get involved, you can find out more at http://craftivist-collective.com/

 

 

 

The Woman Worker

Unlocking Ideas Worth Fighting For

banner National Federation of Women Workers banner, People’s History Museum

In 1903, aged 23, Mary Macarthur arrived in London as Secretary of the Women’s Trade Union League.  In 1906 she established the National Federation of Women Workers to organise women against the sweated industries and in their fight for the working wage.  Between its establishment and its 1921 combination with the National Union of General Workers the NFWW made many advances for women working in industries, for example playing a “major part in inducing the Liberal government to pass the 1909 Trade Boards Act” (Mary Davis, Manchester Metropolitan University).

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First published in 1906 by the NFWW, The Woman Worker sought to further the work of the Federation through a combination of anecdotes, informative articles, allegories and relevant advertisements.

“To teach the need for unity, to help improve working conditions, to present a monthly picture of the many activities of women Trade…

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